Currencies

Asia markets tentative ahead of Opec meeting

Wednesday 2.30am GMT Overview Markets across Asia were treading cautiously on Wednesday, following mild overnight gains for Wall Street, a weakening of the US dollar and as investors turned their attention to a meeting between Opec members later today. What to watch Oil prices are in focus ahead of Wednesday’s Opec meeting in Vienna. The […]

Continue Reading

Banks, Financial

RBS emerges as biggest failure in tough UK bank stress tests

Royal Bank of Scotland has emerged as the biggest failure in the UK’s annual stress tests, forcing the state-controlled lender to present regulators with a new plan to bolster its capital position by at least £2bn. Barclays and Standard Chartered also failed to meet some of their minimum hurdles in the toughest stress scenario ever […]

Continue Reading

Banks

Barclays: life in the old dog yet

Barclays, a former basket case of British banking, is beginning to look inspiringly mediocre. The bank has failed Bank of England stress tests less resoundingly than Royal Bank of Scotland. Investors believe its assets are worth only 10 per cent less than their book value, judging from the share price. Although Barclays’s legal team have […]

Continue Reading

Currencies, Equities

Scary movie sequel beckons for eurozone markets

Just as horror movies can spook fright nerds more than they expect, so political risk is sparking heightened levels of anxiety among seasoned investors. Investors caught out by Brexit and Donald Trump are making better preparations for political risk in Europe, plotting a route to the exit door if the unfolding story of French, German […]

Continue Reading

Currencies

Dollar rises as markets turn eyes to Opec

European bourses are mirroring a tentative Asia session as the dollar continues to be supported by better US economic data and investors turn their attention to a meeting between Opec members. Sentiment is underpinned by US index futures suggesting the S&P 500 will gain 3 points to 2,207.3 when trading gets under way later in […]

Continue Reading

Categorized | Economy

Draghi: Eurozone will decline without vital productivity growth


Posted on November 30, 2016

It’s productivity, stupid.

European Central Bank president Mario Draghi has become the latest major policymaker to warn of the long-term economic damage posed by chronically low productivity growth, as he urged eurozone governments to take action to lift growth and stoke innovation.

Speaking in Madrid on Wednesday, Mr Draghi noted that productivity rises in the eurozone – as measured by workers’ output per hour – have fallen significantly behind the US in the wake of the financial crisis, with growth falling from 2 per cent to 0.5 per cent in recent years.

Raising productivity is vital to boost future economic growth, improve living standards, and help ease the burden on government public finances. Weak output per hour has also plagued the UK and the US since 2009, posing a major headache for economists who have sought to explain its decline.

Mr Draghi attributed weak productivity growth to non-manufacturing firms’ poor ability to absorb technological changes to improve their efficiency – a situation made worse by weak competition in many sectors.

Should governments fail to undertake reforms to lift productivity, encourage business innovation and liberalise labour markets, he warned income growth in the single currency area “is likely to stagnate and may even decline”.

Ahead of a key ECB meeting next week, the Italian central banker said policymakers were taking action to ensure that low interest rates do not become a permanent feature of the eurozone economy, “but we alone cannot eliminate that risk”, he said.

“Monetary policy is providing support and space for governments to carry out necessary structural reforms. It is up to euro area governments to act, individually at national level as well as jointly at European level”, he said.